Five SBA 8(a) Business Plan Templates

Each newly certified SBA 8(a) Participant must develop a comprehensive 8(a) business plan (Form 1010c) setting forth its business targets, objectives, and goals.

Typically your 8(a) Business Plan must be submitted within 30 days from the date of its 8(a) program admission. Your 8(a) firm will not be eligible for 8(a) program benefits, including 8(a) contracts, until its 8(a) business plan is approved.

Failure to provide an 8(a) Business Plan in a timely manner and receive approval can result in early termination by the SBA.

The 8(a) business plan must address all 52 of the SBA Form 1010c questions and contain the following information:

(1)    A detailed description of any products currently being produced and any services currently being performed by the concern, as well as any future plans to enter into one or more new markets;

(2)    The applicant’s designation of its primary industry classification, as defined in § 124.3;

(3)    An analysis of market potential, competitive environment, and the concern’s prospects for profitable operations during and after its participation in the 8(a) program;

(4)    An analysis of the concern’s strengths and weaknesses, with particular attention on ways to correct any financial, managerial, technical, or work force conditions which could impede the concern from receiving and performing non-8(a) contracts;

(5)    Specific targets, objectives, and goals for the business development of the concern during the next two years;

(6)    Estimates of both 8(a) and non-8(a) contract awards that will be needed to meet its targets, objectives and goals; and

(7) Such other information as SBA may require.

For companies needing assistance in the development Plan we offer 5 different sample 8(a) Business Plans that can help you develop your 8(a) Business Plan.

Visit http://www.cloveer.com/8abusinessplans.html to purchase one of the below plans. The cost for each plan is $159.95 and is available for immediate download.

Information Technology 8(a) Business plan

Our sample IT 8(a) Business Plan is designed for firms that operate in the in the 5145 (541511, 541512, 541513 or 541519) NAICS code. It contains an actual 8(a) Business Plan for an IT Company. This is a real 8(a) Business Plan that has been submitted and accepted by the SBA.  Our sample will allow you to see responses to each of the SBA 1010c 52 questions. You can use it to build your own unique business plan and type your responses to each of the SBA 1010C’s 52 questions and build an editable document that will be acceptable by the SBA.

Management Consulting 8(a) Business plan

Our sample Management Consulting Business Plan is designed for firms that operate in the 5416 (541611, 541612, 541613, 541614, 541618, 541620, 541690) NAICS code. It contains an actual 8(a) Business Plan for an Management Consulting Company. Our sample will allow you to see responses to each of the SBA 1010c 52 questions. You can use it to build your own unique business plan and type your responses to each of the SBA 1010C’s 52 questions and build an editable document that will be acceptable by the SBA.

Construction & Related Trades 8(a) business plan

Our sample Construction 8(a) Business Plan is designed for firms that operate in the 236 or 237 (236115, 236116, 236117, 236118, 236210, 236220, 237110, 237120, 237130, 237310 or 237990) NAICS code. It contains an actual 8(a) Business Plan for a Construction Company.Our sample will allow you to see responses to each of the SBA 1010c 52 questions. You can use it to build your own unique business plan and type your responses to each of the SBA 1010C’s 52 questions and build an editable document that will be acceptable by the SBA.

Engineering 8(a) business plan

Our sample Engineering 8(a) Business Plan is designed for firms that operate in the 5413 (541330) NAICS code. It contains an actual 8(a) Business Plan for a Professional Engineering Company.

Our sample will allow you to see responses to each of the SBA 1010c 52 questions. You can use it to build your own unique business plan and type your responses to each of the SBA 1010C’s 52 questions and build an editable document that will be acceptable by the SBA.

Janitorial 8(a) business plan

Our sample Janitorial 8(a) Business Plan is designed for firms that operate in the 561 (561710, 561720, 561730, 561740 and 561790) NAICS code. It contains an actual 8(a) Business Plan for a Janitorial Company.

Our sample will allow you to see responses to each of the SBA 1010c 52 questions. You can use it to build your own unique business plan and type your responses to each of the SBA 1010C’s 52 questions and build an editable document that will be acceptable by the SBA.

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How to write an Executive Summary for your 8a Business Plan

The Executive Summary is the most important section of your 8a business plan. It provides a concise overview of the entire plan along with a history of your company. This section describes the fundamental elements of your business, as well as what business you are in, why you are in it, and what you hope to accomplish. For example, describe your business in terms of where it has come from, where it is now, where you want it to go, and how you plan to get it there.  This section is important because it explains why you think your business idea will be successful.  This is a complete summary of your 8a business plan and should be the last section you write. After you’ve completed all the other details of your plan, you’ll be better able to summarize it.  1 to 2 pages is an appropriate length for the executive summary.

Here are some important elements to include in your Executive Summary:

  • The Mission Statement – The mission statement briefly explains the thrust of your business. It could be two words, two sentences, a paragraph, or even a single image. It should be as direct and focused as possible, and it should leave the reader with a clear picture of what your business is all about.
  • Date business began
  • Names of founders and the functions they perform
  • Number of employees
  • Location of business including branches or subsidiaries
  • Description of plant or facilities
  • Primary industry and NAICS code
  • Products manufactured/services rendered
  • Summary of company growth since the beginning, including financial or market highlights
  • Summary of future plans

With the exception of the mission statement, all of the information in the Executive Summary should be brief since the details will be provided further along in the plan.

For newly certified 8a companies, Cloveer provides professional assistance in preparing SBA acceptable 8a Business Plans.

What is an 8a Participation Agreement?

Every company that becomes 8a Certified with the SBA must sign a participation agreement.  The agreement is the same for all companies and by signing it, you are agreeing to abide by the 8(a) BD regulations, 13 C.F.R. § 124, which can be found at http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_07/13cfr124_07.html.

In addition, you will be agreeing to submit financial statements and tax returns on an annual basis.  For companies with gross annual receipts between $1M and $5M the financials must be reviewed by an independent qualified public accountant.  For companies with gross annual receipts over $5M, the financials must be audited by an independent qualified public accountant.

The participation agreement also provides a list of 26 items that will cause termination from the program. Three examples of occurrences that can cause termination of your company from the 8a program are:

  1. Failure by the concern to obtain prior written approval from SBA for any changes in ownership, business structure, management, or control.  Hiring a key officer without prior approval is an example of this.
  2. Failure by the concern to obtain prior SBA approval of any management agreement, joint venture agreement or other agreement relative to the performance of a section 8(a) subcontract.
  3. Failure by the concern to provide SBA with Annual Update reports as required.

An actual Participation Agreement including the complete list of conditions and causes for termination is available for viewing.  For expert assistance with maintaining 8a program compliance and annual reporting requirements, contact Cloveer.

The 8a Business Plan

The 8a Business Plan

Development of the 8a Business Plan

Each newly certified 8a Participant must develop a comprehensive business plan setting forth its business targets, objectives, and goals. Although the 8a Business Plan is not required to be completed and submitted as part of a Participant’s 8a Application submission, it must be submitted to the SBA servicing office as soon as possible after 8a program admission. Typically the 8a Business Plan must be submitted within 30 days from the date of its 8a program admission or from its attendance at mandatory SBA 8a program orientation. The 8a Participant will not be eligible for 8a program benefits, including 8a contracts, until its 8a business plan is approved.

Failure to provide an 8a Business Plan in a timely manner and receive approval can result in early termination by the SBA.

The 8a business plan must address all 52 of the SBA Form 1010c questions and contain the following information:

(1)    A detailed description of any products currently being produced and any services currently being performed by the concern, as well as any future plans to enter into one or more new markets;

(2)    The applicant’s designation of its primary industry classification, as defined in § 124.3;

(3)    An analysis of market potential, competitive environment, and the concern’s prospects for profitable operations during and after its participation in the 8a BD program;

(4)    An analysis of the concern’s strengths and weaknesses, with particular attention on ways to correct any financial, managerial, technical, or work force conditions which could impede the concern from receiving and performing non-8a contracts;

(5)    Specific targets, objectives, and goals for the business development of the concern during the next two years;

(6)    Estimates of both 8a and non-8a contract awards that will be needed to meet its targets, objectives and goals; and

(7) Such other information as SBA may require.

Updating the 8a Business Plan

Each 8a Participant must annually review its business plan with its assigned Business Opportunity

Specialist (BOS), and modify the plan as appropriate. The 8a Participant must submit a modified plan and updated information to its BOS within thirty 30 days after the close of each program year. It also must submit a capability statement describing its current contract performance capabilities as part of its updated 8a business plan.

As part of the annual review of its 8a business plan, each 8a Participant must annually forecast in writing its needs for contract awards for the next program year.

For companies needing assistance in the development or updating of their 8a Business Plan, please visit http://www.cloveer.com/.