Hubzone Application. What information must be provided to get certified.

Keep in mind that each Hubzone Application is unique and document requirements vary for each Hubzone Application.

Below is a general list of items that will need to be included within your Hubzone application. Your unique application may require additional items not specified below.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The electronic verification date for your firm’s HUBZone application is the date on which the applicant authorizes the electronic HUBZone Application for processing by the SBA. The verification notice will be sent to the firm via electronic communication by the SBA after completing the HUBZone electronic Application. This date is extremely important to note.

Documents demonstrating your firm meets Ownership & Control and Size requirements:

Corporate documents: Although your firm may not be required to submit all of the following documentation to the Secretary of State, in your state, it is nonetheless required and necessary to determine the eligibility criteria for the SBA HUBZone Program. Failure to provide these documents will result in your application being withdrawn or declined by the SBA.

The following documents must be provided, each of which must be valid at the time of electronic verification and have all required signatures:

If your firm is a Corporation:

  • DBA (Doing Business As) Certificate, if applicable.
  • Articles of Incorporation and any amendments (Only submitting the Secretary of State (SOS) seal certificate is not acceptable. You must also submit a copy of the firm’s Articles of Incorporation along with the SOS seal certificate.)
  • Corporate Bylaws and any amendments.
  • Executed Stock Certificates (front & back).
  • Stock Ledger or Register (This ledger or register should summarize all stock actions taken from issuance through transfer and or cancellation.

If your firm is a Limited Liability Company (LLC):

  • DBA (Doing Business As) Certificate, if applicable.
  • Articles of Organization and any amendments (Only submitting the Secretary of State (SOS) seal certificate is not acceptable. You must also submit a copy of the firm’s Articles of Organization along with the certificate with the SOS seal certificate.)
  • Operating Agreement and any amendments.

If your firm is a Sole Proprietor:

  • DBA (Doing Business As) Certificate, if applicable.

If your firm is a Partnership:

  • DBA (Doing Business As) Certificate, if applicable.
  • Partnership Agreement and any amendments.

Documents demonstrating Firm Ownership, any Affiliation and Citizenship:

  • Proof of US Citizenship for owners. One of the following:
    • Birth certificate
    • Current valid U.S. Passport
    • Certificate of Naturalization.
  • Other key ownership related documents:

If your firm is a member of a franchise you will need to provide a copy of the franchise agreement. If your firm is owned in part by an ESOP or Trust you will need to provide a copy of the ESOP plan or Trust Agreement.

Documents demonstrating your firm meets the Hubzone employment and principal office requirements:

  • Firm location list that lists all locations maintained by your firm or used as job sites to include:
    • Complete address for all office locations and each applicable job site location(s).
    • Specification of which of the following 3 location types it is:
      • Principal Office: Location maintained by your firm (i.e., owned or leased by your firm) where the greatest number of your firm’s employees at any one location perform their work.
      • Other firm location(s): Location(s) maintained by your firm which are NOT the Principal Office.
      • Job site: Firms whose “primary industry” is service or construction should classify as job sites all locations used to fulfill specific contract obligations.
    • A listing of all employees working at the Principal Office.
    • The number of hours that each employee performs their work at the Principal Office location that include the days of week and business hours each office is staffed.
    • The number of hours that each employee performs their work at other office location(s) that include the days of week and business hours each office is staffed at other office location(s).

Please Note: If the firm only operates from the principal office location and there are no other locations or job sites, you must provide the requested information for the principal office location and indicate that there are no other locations and or job sites in writing.

  • A Hubzone Map printout of your principal office location.
  • Lease/rental agreement/deed for Principal Office: A copy of a fully executed lease/rental agreement or deed for the firm’s Principal Office location which is valid and in full effect at the time of electronic verification of your application. Your firm’s full legal name must be identified as being the lessee, renter, or owner. If your lease/rental agreement or deed only includes a parcel description, you must also provide a property tax bill and/or insurance policy supporting the physical address of the Principal Office location.

If you operate out of your primary residence, you must provide a copy of the deed for your primary residence, a copy of a utility bill that covers the period of time including the electronic verification of your application. Examples include gas, electric, water, sewer or landline telephone. Cellular phone bills are not acceptable. You must also provide a copy of the firms insurance policy too.

Note: A property tax bill and/or insurance policy is for verification of the physical address only. Submission of this document in lieu of the required lease or deed is not acceptable.

  • Utility bill for Principal Office:  You must provide a copy of a utility bill for the firm’s Principal Office that covers the period of time including the electronic verification of your application. Examples include gas, electric, water, sewer, internet or landline telephone. Cellular phone bills are not acceptable. If utilities are included with the rent and you cannot provide a land-line telephone bill, you must provide evidence that utilities are included within lease/rental agreement or signed affidavit from lessor indicating this is the case.
  • Employee list: You must provide a complete listing of all who work for the firm at the time of electronic verification, including paid or unpaid owners, salaried or hourly-wage employees, and temporary workers. If an individual has an ownership interest in and works for the business a minimum of 40 hours per month, that owner is considered an employee regardless of whether or not the individual receives compensation. This listing must include for each individual:
    • Full name
    • Description of type of worker, e.g., salaried, included in payroll, owner, leased, obtained through PEO, obtained through union agreement, shared with affiliate, temporary, etc. Note: Some individuals may require multiple designations in the description, “owner, salaried, included in payroll.”
    • Whether or not the individual resides in a Hubzone. This should be supported by the documents specified below regarding Hubzone maps and identification/proof of residence.
    • Number of hours worked per month.
    • Primary work location, e.g., Principal Office, other firm location, OR job site. If the individual works at more than one location, select the location where the individual spends the single greatest portion of their time. (As an example, if an employee works 16 hours per week at the “Principal Office,” 12 hours per week at an “other firm location,” and 12 hours per week at a “job site,” specify the Principal Office as the primary work location).
    • Working days of the week and hours of principal office.
  • Contractor List (If Applicable):

The SBA may use the totality of circumstances to find that independent contractors are considered employees for the purpose of Hubzone certification.

For each independent contractor that worked at least 40 hours during the month preceding the time of review, provide the contractor’s full name and signed copies of executed contracts.

If signed copies of executed contracts are not available, provide:

  • A detailed description of work performed by each independent contractor including the number of hours worked, the type of work performed, and where the work is performed.
  • Copies of all invoices from each independent contractors, and proof of payment for invoices.
  • Do any of the independent contractors have or have they had in the past, business cards issued by your firm? If yes, provide SBA with a copy of the business card.
  • Do any of the independent contractors have email accounts issued to them by your firm? If so, provide SBA with individual’s email address.
  • Payroll records: You must provide a copy of your firm’s official payroll record from a time period which covers the date of electronic verification and shows at a minimum the employee’s name, number of hours worked for that pay period, and wages with taxes and adjustments. (Salaried employees who do not have hours worked specified are assumed to work 40 hours per week.) This payroll record must clearly show the pay period’s beginning and end dates, not just the pay date. Do not submit a combined summary of all the pay periods. Each pay period will need to be provided on a separate payroll record.

Note: In order for the SBA to consider a person working for your firm to be an employee, we must have evidence from your payroll records that the person works at least 40 hours in a month’s time. All payroll records submitted must be for the time of electronic verification and PRIOR.

For example: If Payroll is paid on the 30th of the month and the application is submitted on January 2, 2019. The applicant firm must wait at minimum until the January 31, 2019 payroll is issued before the processing of the application may begin. In this example, you would be prohibited from using the December 31, 2019 payroll date because that date does not include the electronic verification date. For any employees working less than 40 hours in the payroll period which includes the date of electronic verification, you must also provide enough immediately previous payrolls to demonstrate that those employees work at least 40 hours in a month’s time. As an example, if you have a weekly payroll system and an employee who works 10 hours the week of electronic verification, you would need to provide the 3 previous weekly payrolls in order to demonstrate that the person works 40 hours per month for a total of 4 weekly payrolls. The latest of these 4 contiguous payroll periods should include the date of application submission.

  • State and federal employment filings: You must provide complete copies of your firm’s most recently available state unemployment tax filing and the most recently available federal employment quarterly report (Form 941- Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Form). The state unemployment report must include the employee listing supporting the summary of wages.

If the firm has not filed any of the above reports, you must note as such in writing. Failure to provide a response to this request will cause a delay in the processing of the application.

  • Hubzone maps of Hubzone residents’ addresses: Copies of the Hubzone Map to verify each Hubzone employees’ residence is in a Hubzone. In order to provide the Hubzone map for each employee, select the following link:

https://maps.certify.sba.gov/hubzone/map

Once you enter the Hubzone mapping system enter the physical address for each Hubzone employee. Print the page using the Printable Version button on the right side of the screen. Print the page exactly as it is displayed including the personal address for each individual. Altering the Hubzone Map or not providing the entire printout will make the document invalid. Please write the employee’s name at the bottom of each map and provide a printed map for each employee and do not provide one locator for multiple employees.

  • Identification/proof of residence for Hubzone residents: You must provided a copy of a valid (unexpired) Department of Motor Vehicles driver’s license, Department of Motor Vehicles Identification card, or voter’s registration card for each of the firm’s Hubzone resident employees. Do not send Social Security cards. The copy must be legible and show the employee’s full name and address. If the address listed is no longer valid or is a PO Box, you must also provide a copy of a current lease agreement, mortgage statement, utility bill (not cell phone), or change of address card in the name of the individual which shows the Hubzone address where the individual resides. Failure to provide sufficient proof of Hubzone residency for employees could lead to your firm being proposed for de-certification.
  • Provided the appropriate HUBZone Program Certification Signature Sheet (based on your firm’s ownership structure)

This form must be signed by an officer of the firm authorized to represent the applicant, notarized, and mailed in hard copy. An email or faxed copy of the Program Certification Signature Sheet will NOT be accepted.

Please note that if all of the above supporting documentation being requested is not received within the allotted time frame, your application may be withdrawn or declined. Failure to submit information and documentation within the allotted time frame is a common cause of applications being withdrawn or declined. Please make note of your submission deadline.

Other Key Tips:

  • You must have a current SAM.GOV, SBA DSBS (Dynamic Small Business Search) and Dun and Bradstreet (D&B) profile for your business. All profiles must match the address of principal office of the firm.
  • You must identify your primary NAICS code within your SAM.GOV and DSBS Profile.

Cloveer provides assistance with all aspects of the SBA HUBZone Program. Please visit our website for more information or call 813-333-5800.

How to qualify for the 8(a) Program if you have been in business for less than 2 years.

Your business must possess reasonable prospects for success in competing in the private sector if admitted to the 8(a) program.

To do so, it must be in business in its primary industry classification (NAICS code) for at least two full years (24 months) immediately prior to the date of its 8(a) application and be able to provide business tax returns for each of the two previous tax years that show sufficient operating revenues earned within the primary industry (NAICS code) in which the applicant is seeking 8(a) certification for.

The SBA may waive the two years in business requirement if each of the following five conditions can be met:

Condition 1: The individual or individuals upon whom eligibility is based have substantial business management experience.

  • Provide resumes for the 8(a) Applicant(s) showing past employment history that exhibit significant management experience such as:
    • Being previously employed performing management duties (CEO, VP, CFO, President, Director).
    • Showing you successfully operated a similar business concern in the past and/or managing projects and employees to at least the equivalent size of the contracts and number of employees that the applicant business is working on currently.
  • In addition, the applicant and other key individuals of the business concern must also have the required technical capabilities, if required in your business situation. The applicant must hold all requisite licenses (Contractors, Professional Engineer, Accountant, etc.) and professional certifications within firms who have been in business for less than two years.
  • If you only have 1-3 years of business management experience you may not meet the substantial business management experience required by the SBA.

Condition 2: The applicant has demonstrated technical experience to carry out its business plan with a substantial likelihood for success if admitted to the 8(a) BD program.

  • Provide evidence of a business plan or some semblance of a business plan that:
    • Details your Marketing/Sales, Products/Services, Management/Organizational/Personnel and Finance goals and demonstrated progress towards the goals you specified.
    • Outlines any unique or special technical expertise that you and your team have and how you believe it will sustain your business during its early formative years.
  • Provide copies of independent reference letters from your active and completed clients, directly addressed to the applicant, that establish successful contract performance.

Condition 3: The applicant has adequate capital to sustain the operations and carry out its business plan as a participant.

  • Your business must have sufficient working capital available. Sufficient working capital is generally defined as a minimum of 3 months’ worth of working capital immediately available to your business.
  • Provide your most recent business bank account (s) statements that support that you have 3 times your monthly burn rate.
  • In lieu of cash in your business bank account, a business line of credit may be substituted. In this case, you will need to provide a copy of the business line of credit documents and a current statement showing the availability of enough working capital.
  • You should also describe your general payment terms and what actions your business takes to expedite the timely collection of receivables including how fast you typically receive payments from invoices.

Condition 4: The applicant has a record of successful performance on contracts from governmental or nongovernmental sources in its primary industry category.

  • Provide at least one business tax return showing approximately $100,000 to $150,000 in gross receipts. The business tax return provided must be the most recently filed year with the IRS (2018). If your most recently filed business tax return (2018) shows none or less than $100,000 you will most likely not be able to seek a waiver.
  • Be able to display to the SBA that your business is not economically dependent on one client for more than 70% of your revenues from its inception. This means that your breakdown of contracts must show you are earning revenues from multiple entities, within the primary NAICS code you are seeking 8(a) Certification for and show that not more than 70% of the total revenue earned was with one single entity. The 70% rule does not apply if your direct billable client is a federal, state or local government agency.
  • Provide copies of all paid invoices and bank statements showing the depositing of all revenue earned that matches the business financial statements provided to the SBA.
  • If you have a potential federal client that may want to procure your products or services, should you become 8(a) certified, you should attempt to obtain and provide noncommittal letters of reference as additional evidence.
  • In addition, the SBA may require proof that the government previously procured and is likely to procure the types of products or services offered by your business. Proof can be provided in the form of FBO.GOV or FPDS.GOV printouts of previous 8(a) procurement’s that have occurred and are similar in nature to your products or services offered by your business.

Condition 5: The applicant has, or can demonstrate its ability to timely obtain, the personnel, facilities, equipment, and any other requirements needed to perform contracts as a Participant.

  • You must have all required personnel needed for your current contract requirements. You should detail the current number of employees you have, any future hiring of personnel required and how you will recruit and attract additional employees including timelines for hiring and any special relationship that exist with recruiters, personnel agencies and temporary agencies. You must also be able to show the SBA that you meet the 8(a) subcontracting requirements. See CFR §125.6 for what are the prime contractor’s limitations on subcontracting for the specific percentages.
  • For facilities requirements you should detail your current office space, any future locations or expansions, how you will lease or purchase new office space including any relationships that exist with local commercial real estate brokers.
  • For equipment requirements you should detail your current equipment owned or leased that is needed to perform on contracts, any future equipment needed along with where you will lease or purchase and how you will finance or lease the equipment needed.
  • If bonding is required, you will need to provide a letter from your surety company stating your single and aggregate amount of bonding available.

Cloveer offers a 8(a) Length of Time (Two Year) Waiver Guide and Sample for sale and immediate download through our site for $150.00. Our two year waiver guide and sample explains and shows you how to properly address all five (5) required areas.

Is your 8(a) Program AGI above the $250,000 limitation? Here is how to find out.

The $250,000 Threshold for Adjusted Gross Income (AGI)

Among the many 8(a) business development program eligibility requirements the applicant for 8(a) Certification must have is an average AGI over the past three taxes years of less than $250,000.

What is the definition of Adjusted Gross Income?

Adjusted gross income (AGI) is a tax term for an amount used in the calculation of an individual’s income tax liability. AGI is calculated by taking the applicants gross income and subtracting their maximum allowable adjustments. AGI is located on line 37 on your Form 1040 for 2017 personal taxes and before and on Line 7 for 2018 personal taxes.

How do I determine my Adjusted Gross Income for 8(a) Certification Purposes?

Step 1: The easiest way to initially determine if you exceed the $250,000 threshold, averaged over the last three years is to add up the AGI number reported on the first page of your last three years of federal tax returns.

Please note: If your portion of the applicant firm’s business income is negative or shown as a loss, you cannot deduct this loss from your AGI since losses from an S corporation, LLC or partnership are losses to the company only and are not losses to the individual and cannot be used to reduce your AGI.

If you add these three numbers, divide them by three and result is a number larger than $250,000 you must do further analysis. Go to Step 2.

If the number is less than $250,000 and your distributions taken out the company do not exceed the profits reported for your business on its tax return, your AGI is less than $250,000 without doing any further analysis.

If your distributions exceed the profits reported for your business, you must do further analysis. Go to Step 2.

Step 2: If your resulting calculation shows more than $250,000 or your distributions exceed the profits reported for your business on its tax return, and you are filing the taxes jointly with your spouse, you will then need to separate out the portion of any income reported on the tax return between the applicant and their spouse. See (Line 7 through 21 for 2017 tax returns and before and for 2018 tax returns (Line 1 through 5B + Schedule 1, line 22)

For example: (Line 7 (1040). Wages, salaries, tips, etc. = $100,000 (Applicant’s portion, $40,000 – Spouse’s portion, $60,000). Do the same for each income line as specified above.

Once you have separated out all income reported on the tax return between the applicant and their spouse take the total for the last three years and divide them by three. If the resulting calculation is still larger than $250,000 you must do further analysis. Go to Step 3.

If the number is less than $250,000 and your distributions taken out the company do not exceed the profits reported for your business on its tax return, your AGI is less than $250,000 without doing any further analysis.

Step 3:  There is one final analysis that can be performed to see if you still exceed the $250,000 AGI threshold. If the applicant business concern is an S corporation, LLC or partnership you may:

(Please note: Single Member LLC’s that file a Schedule C cannot use the below in their calculations, per the SBA):

  1. Deduct any income associated with the business that was reinvested into the business concern, less any distributions taken.

Example 1: Your applicant business income shown on the tax return is $100,000. You took $0 in distributions. The result is that $100,000 was reinvested or not distributed therefore the entire $100,000 can be deducted from your AGI calculation.

Example 2: Your applicant business income shown on the tax return is $100,000. You took $50,000 in distributions. The result is that $50,000 was reinvested or not distributed therefore the $50,000 can be deducted from your AGI calculation.

  1. Deduct any income used to pay the LLC or S-Corporation Federal taxes owed on behalf of the income from your LLC or S-Corporation income reported. Please note the SBA does not count or allow any State taxes you may have paid to reduce your AGI. Only Federal taxes paid are allowable to reduce your AGI.

In order to determine what the Federal taxable income tax that you paid on behalf of the business income reported on your tax return you must determine your IRS Income Tax rate.

To determine your IRS Income Tax rate, look at page 2 of your 1040 form (Line 43 – Taxable Income) for 2017 and before. For 2018, look at page 1 of your 1040 form (Line 10 – Taxable income).

Then, click here to visit a site that will show you your tax bracket percentage. Be sure the indicate the tax year, filing status and then lookup your tax bracket percentage based upon your taxable income.

Example: Your applicant business income shown on the tax return is $100,000. Your determined IRS Income Tax rate is 24% therefore you are responsible for $24,000 that would be paid to the IRS on the income from your business reported and the result would be an additional $24,000 that can be deducted from your AGI calculation.

As you can see from above, determining your AGI can be somewhat complex for 8(a) Certification purposes. Cloveer can help you to determine your AGI should you need further assistance. We offer an AGI Analysis Service for $250.00 where we will perform an analysis for the last three years and provide you a detailed report showing you exactly what your AGI is for each year and averaged over the last three years. If you are interested in this service, please request a service agreement or give us a call at 813-333-5800 for more information.

What information will need to be provided with your 8(a) Application.

Keep in mind that each 8(a) Application is unique and document requirements vary for each 8(a) Application.

Below is a general list of items that will need to be included within your 8(a) application. Your unique application may require additional items not specified below.

  • Signed 1040 personal tax returns (last three filing years) including all schedules, attachments, W-2’s, 1099’s and proof of payment for any tax owed for each 8(a) Applicant and their spouse.
  • Signed business federal tax returns including all schedules and attachments for the last three filing years, or as many as you have been in business, if less than 3 years. Proof of payment for any tax owed may be required, if applicable.
  • Balance Sheet, Income Statement, A/P and A/R aging statements no older than 30 days old for the current year to date. Please note, your financial statements must be prepared either on an income tax basis or be GAAP compliant.
  • Balance Sheet, Income Statement, A/P and A/R aging statements for the last three completed fiscal years.
  • resume for each 8(a) Applicant and any other key officer, employee, director or 10% or more owner.
  • A detailed listing of all clients broken down by revenue earned for the last 12 months and possibly for the last three years.
  • A current certificate of good standing (required for Corporations and LLC’s only).
  • Stock certificates/Stock ledger (Corp), Membership Certificates/ledger(LLC).
  • Articles of Incorporation/Organization/Partnership filing/DBA Filing.
  • Foreign Organization Filings and associated Certificates of Good Standing (If applicable).
  • Articles of Conversion/Buy-Sell Agreements, Voting Agreements (if applicable).
  • Bylaws, Operating Agreement or Partnership Agreement.
  • Stockholder/Board or Member Meeting minutes (Most Recent).
  • Proof of US Citizenship (if required).
  • Business bank signature cards.
  • Copies of all business and special licenses.
  • Copies of any business loan agreements.
  • A copy of the current lease agreement for business.
  • A current personal financial statement and supporting statements for  the following: (Checking/Savings, IRAs with terms and conditions, Life Insurance (Cash Surrender only), Stocks/Bonds, Mortgage, Deeds, Fair Market Value for Real Estate, Home Owners Insurance Policy, Any Other Assets (Boats, RV’s, Motorcycle, Other Business Ownership, etc.), Automobile Title/Registration and associated loans, Credit Cards, Home equity or any other Loan Agreements (Student, etc.).

Common misconceptions about getting 8(a) Certified

Myth: It’s easy to get SBA 8(a) Certified.

As of November 2019 there are only 5,900 active 8(a) Program participants and have never been more than 10,000 active 8(a) Program participants at any one time in the SBA 8(a) Program’s history. Fact: The SBA returns over 90% of all 8(a) applications submitted and rejects 70% of all 8(a) applications submitted for review.

Myth: All I need to do is fill out the SBA’s 8(a) electronic application through certify.sba.gov and I will get 8(a) Certified.

The SBA’s 8(a) electronic application is where you formally apply and submit your 8(a) application responses and upload your unique documentation, however in order to even get to the certify.sba.gov process you must do a lot of leg work.  You must have a Dun and Bradstreet Profile, SAM.GOV profile and gathered and collected all of the required documents to be submitted to the SBA. Just collecting the required information does not guarantee that you will get 8(a) Certified. There are many requirements that the 8(a) applicant and firm must meet, along with the SBA requirements within your unique documents submitted to the SBA. For example. Just submitting your Bylaws or Operating Agreement may not cut it. There are specific provisions within these documents to ensure the unconditional requirements of the 8(a) Program are met. Fact: The certify.sba.gov 8(a) application does not allow you to move forward to the next question, most of the time, without having uploaded the required documents, in the appropriate format requested. Also, the SBA application will not automatically inform you if you have an eligibility issue.

Myth: Once I submit my 8(a) application through certify.sba.gov I am done and will get 8(a) Certified quickly.

Typically, when you answer all of the questions, upload all of the required documents and hit the submit button, the SBA takes anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks to assign a reviewer to your case. At this point, they will most likely come back and ask for additional information or clarifications, regardless of how complete and thorough you thought you were when completed the 8(a) Application. If your SBA reviewer makes a determination that your 8(a) application is not complete, they will return your 8(a) Application and you must go through the 8(a) application submission process again. This results in a minimum of a 15 to 30 day additional delay. Assuming you properly answer, respond to and upload any additional information requested by the SBA reviewer and re-submit your 8(a) Application, your back in the queue again. We call this the endless review cycle at the SBA and this is where most get frustrated and just give up. Fact: It takes anywhere from 90 to 180 days to get formally 8(a) Certified even if all of your information was 100% correct and perfect. The SBA does not even start this 90-180 clock until the deem your 8(a) application complete for processing.

Myth: Once I get 8(a) Certified, I am guaranteed a federal contract.

Getting 8(a) certified does not guarantee that you will receive an 8(a) contract. Fact: About 50% of all 8(a) Program participants never receive one contract because they do not know how to market their business to the federal government. Getting 8(a) certified will certainly open opportunities at the federal level but you must still spend the time and effort in marketing your business to potential federal clients.

Myth: My ASBDC, PTAC and local SBA office told me I qualified to become 8(a) Certified.

There are only two processing offices (King of Prussia, PA and San Francisco, CA) that review all 8(a) applications submitted. Final determination on whether you will become 8(a) certified is made within the Washington, DC office. There are approximately 10-15 SBA 8(a) Application reviewers within the two processing offices.  Fact: Anyone who tells you that you qualify for 8(a) certification before reviewing ALL of your 8(a) application paperwork does not know what they are talking about and it will most likely result in your 8(a) Application being returned or denied by the SBA.

Myth: I don’t need any assistance in putting my 8(a) application together.

Unless you understand the SBA 8(a) Program Regulations, you should not attempt to put your 8(a) Application together yourself. The SBA 8(a) Application has many tripwires and potential application “killers” that could cause your 8(a) application to be returned for incompleteness or even rejected. We suggest that you find some assistance to help with some or all areas of your 8(a) application.

At Cloveer, we conduct a detailed free pre-qualification interview with any potential client before we engage or start preparing their 8(a) application.

Our questionnaire asks you the “Killer” questions that will let us, or more importantly you, know if you have an eligibility issue.

Fact: There are ways around a lot of the 8(a) Program eligibility issues but not everyone will be able to qualify.

We advise any potential client on the pros and cons to any eligibility issue and tell them when they have an eligibility issue that has no workarounds. Our feeling is that is it better for you to know now, rather than later.

As you can see from our blog, website and 8(a) frequently asked questions section, we provide more information about the 8(a) Program than all of our competitors.

We want you to know as much information about the SBA 8(a) Program as possible since you will be the one participating and using it as one of the tools to becoming a success.

The more you know, the better decisions you can make before you apply and while you are in the 8(a) Program.

For more information on the 8(a) Program, call us at 813-333-5800 or schedule a call to have your questions answered.

Want to know if you qualify for the SBA 8(a) Program?

Exploring the possibility of applying for the SBA 8(a) Program?

Don’t know where to start? The first step is to find out if you meet the SBA’s 8(a) Program eligibility requirements before you decide to take the leap into the complex 8(a) Application.

Cloveer offers a free online 8(a) eligibility questionnaire that will help determine your current state for 8(a) Program eligibility.

8(a) Eligbility Questionnaire

The questionnaire will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete online and is free.

As you answer the majority of the questions, our tool will automatically inform you if you have a potential 8(a) Program eligibility issue.

The questionnaire covers 100% of all current 8(a) eligibility criteria.

Upon your submission of eligibility questionnaire we will review your responses and follow up to discuss your current state of 8(a) Program eligibility and answer any additional questions you might have.

8a Eligibility Tool Screenshot

Sample Screenshot of 8(a) Eligibility Questionnaire

Three Templates to Simplify your HUBZone Application

For companies needing assistance with their HUBZone Application, we offer 3 different templates that can help you to provide the information that the SBA requires.

Firms applying for HUBZone certification have 10 business days from the date of electronic verification of the online application to upload their supporting documentation to the SBA.

This supporting HUBZone documentation must include proof that at least 35% of all of the firm’s employees live in a HUBZone, regardless of where they work, as well as proof of the Principal Office location.

All firms including Corporations, LLCs, Partnerships and Sole Proprietors are required to provide an Employee List and a Firm Location List as part of the required proof.  The SBA requires certain elements to be provided with each of these lists.  Cloveer has designed templates to assist you with providing correct and complete details for your employees and office locations.

In addition, for companies that are run from home rather than a commercial location, we have “Home Lease Letters” to assist you in explaining your principal office arrangements to the SBA.

Visit https://cloveer.com/shop/ to purchase one or more of the below templates. The cost for each template is $50.00 and they are available for immediate download.

Employee List Template

At least 35% of all the firm’s employees must live in a HUBZone, regardless of where they work.

The SBA requires that all HUBZone Applicants provide an Employee List as part of their proof that they meet the 35% HUBZone Residency requirement.

Our Employee List template will assist you to fulfill this requirement.

Firm Location List Template

A firm’s principal office is the location where the greatest number of employees perform their work.  To qualify for HUBZone Certification, that principal office must be located in a HUBZone.

The SBA requires that all HUBZone Applicants provide a Firm Location List as part of their proof that they meet the Principal Office requirements.

Our Firm Location List template will assist you to fulfill this requirement.

HUBZone Home Lease Letter Templates

The SBA requires that all HUBZone Applicants provide a Lease, Rental Agreement or Deed executed in the Company’s name as part of their proof that they meet the Principal Office requirements.

If you run your business out of your personal residence that you own or rent, our Home Lease Letter template will assist you to fulfill this requirement.

Need assistance with your HUBZone Application? With 15 years experience and over 2,000 successful applications under our belt, we can assure you that no matter which option you choose, Cloveer will work harder and faster to get your business SBA HUBZone certified.  Contact us today at 813-333-5800 or visiting our website at cloveer.com to discover what Cloveer can do for you.