8(a) Certification: Are you earning revenue from a past employer?

When you apply for the 8(a) Program the SBA will look at your current year to date and the past two to three years of revenue and whom it earned its revenue from. If you have earned revenue from a client who happens to be your past employer the SBA may take issue with this.

The relationship your firm has with your former employer can have a negative impact on your ability to get successfully 8(a) Certified if it results in the ability for them to impact the ability for you to control your firm. Earning a large percentage of your revenue from a past employer may result in the SBA denying your application.

Why?

As stated above, the SBA will look at your mix of clients and if a large percentage of your revenue comes from a past employer they could possibly try to affiliate you with your past employer since you had a employer/employee relationship. There is no magical number for the percentage since they look at the totality of the relationship such as contracts, subcontracts, sharing of employees, facilities, etc.

If you do have a relationship with your former employer you should try to keep any possible affiliation to a minimum.

To determine your overall state of 8(a) eligibility including possible issues such as above, please visit https://cloveer.com/8a-eligibility-questionnaire/ and complete/submit your responses to us for a free eligibility analysis.

Need assistance with your 8(a) Application? With 15 years and over 2,000 successful applications under our belt, we can assure you that no matter which option you choose, Cloveer will work harder and faster to get your business SBA 8a certified.  Contact us today at 813-333-5800 or visiting our website at cloveer.com to discover what Cloveer can do for you.

 

8(a) Certification and Community Property Laws

§124.104   Who is economically disadvantaged?

(2) When married, an individual claiming economic disadvantage must submit separate financial information for his or her spouse, unless the individual and the spouse are legally separated. SBA will consider a spouse’s financial situation in determining an individual’s access to credit and capital where the spouse has a role in the business (e.g., an officer, employee or director) or has lent money to, provided credit support to, or guaranteed a loan of the business. SBA does not take into consideration community property laws when determining economic disadvantage.

This means that both the applicant (individual claiming disadvantage) and his or her spouse must submit a separate SBA 413 Form during the 8(a) Application process, unless:

They are legally separated.

and;

The SBA will not split all assets and liabilities 50/50 unless they are jointly owned or there is a pre and/or post nuptial agreement that details which assets are held by one individual or another, separately.

§124.105   What does it mean to be unconditionally owned by one or more disadvantaged individuals?

(k) Community property laws given effect. In determining ownership interests when an owner resides in any of the community property states or territories of the United States (Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Puerto Rico, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin), SBA considers applicable state community property laws. If only one spouse claims disadvantaged status, that spouse’s ownership interest will be considered unconditionally held only to the extent it is vested by the community property laws. A transfer or relinquishment of interest by the non-disadvantaged spouse may be necessary in some cases to establish eligibility.

This means that the applicant (individual claiming disadvantage) and their spouse must execute a community property transmutation agreement to ensure that they have transferred or relinquished the proper percentage of ownership held within the applicant firm so that the applicant has unconditional ownership of the applicant firm that is applying for the 8(a) Program.

If you need a template to prepare an acceptable Community Property Transmutation Agreement, please visit our shop that contains a template for purchase.

 

8(a) Certification: Ownership or outside work in any other business can be a certification show stopper!

The applicant(s) for 8(a) Certification must devote full-time to the business that is applying for the 8(a) Program with no outside employment. This means that they must generally work at least 40 hours a week during the normal hours of operation of the business that is applying for the 8(a) Program.

If the applicant(s) have an ownership or are an officer, director or partner  in any other business, other than the business that is applying for the 8(a) Program, the SBA may very well deny your 8(a) Application.

Why?

As stated above, you must devote full-time during the normal hours of operation of the business. If you have ownership or are an officer, director or partner in another business the SBA will likely conclude that you are not devoting full-time to the applicant business even if you do not devote any hours to the operation of this other business.

How to overcome this potential show-stopper?

a. You can dissolve this other business and provide evidence of dissolution to the SBA during the application review process.

b. You can formally resign your officer, director or partner position in this other business and provide evidence of resignation.

b. You can sell your ownership in this other business. The sale must take place at fair market value and you must be able to provide proof of the sale and a copy of any proceeds you might receive. Be sure to factor in any funds you receive as a result of this sale. You must also resign all positions you held in this other business and provide proof of this resignation.

What if the other business is just a business for holding real estate?

If the other business is just for holding real estate and you can prove this to the SBA, you can most likely keep your ownership in this other business since this other business is solely for the purpose of holding and/or protecting you ownership interest in the properties that it holds.

Need assistance with your 8(a) Application? With 15 years and over 2,000 successful applications under our belt, we can assure you that no matter which option you choose, Cloveer will work harder and faster to get your business SBA 8a certified.  Contact us today at 813-333-5800 or visiting our website at www.cloveer.com to discover what Cloveer can do for you.

2 Year Waiver Guide; How to prepare the 2 year waiver for your 8(a) Application

Who needs to provide a Length of Time in Business Waiver/Two Year Waiver?

Your firm must demonstrate potential for success by showing two years in business. Please note that if the business concern has not yet generated revenues you will be unable to waive the two-year rule.

If the business has not generated revenues for the preceding two years, as verified by sufficient revenues reported on business tax returns, you will need to request the Length of Time in Business Waiver/ Two Year Waiver.

Proof of two years operation in the firm’s primary industry as verified by sufficient revenues reported in business tax returns for the two previous tax years, NOT the business concerns anniversary date.

What are the SBA requirements to be able to apply for the 8(a) Program using the Length of Time in Business Waiver/Two Year Waiver?

  1. The 8(a) applicant(s) must possess substantial business managerial experience.
  2. The business concern must have demonstrated that it has the technical expertise it will need to carry out its business plan with substantial likelihood for success.
  3. The business concern must have adequate capital to sustain its operations and carry out its business plan.
  4. The business concern must have a record of successful performance on contracts in its primary NAICS code.
  5. The business concern must have (or can quickly obtain) the personnel, facilities, equipment, and other resources it needs to perform any 8(a) contracts it might be awarded.

Our 2 year waiver guide contains very detailed instructions on how to satisfy each of the 5 conditions including what you should detail in your narrative for each condition as well as the exact supporting documents you must provide to the SBA to support your narrative. Additionally, a detailed example narrative write-up for each condition is provided in our guide.

Our 2017 SBA 2 Year Waiver Guide will assist in the preparation and 100% completion of the 2 Year Waiver for your SBA 8(a) Application. This downloadable guide is $150.00. Click on the Buy Now button below to purchase the guide and download now. This guide will not only show you how to properly prepare the 2 Year Waiver but will save you countless hours of trying to figure out how to properly complete the 2 Year Waiver and possible endless back and forth or long delays of the processing of your 8(a) application by the SBA.

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Tips to select the right consultant to prepare your 8a, HUBZone or VetBiz Application.

1. Pick up the phone. Call them and speak to the actual person who will be preparing your application. 

You should be able to call them and speak directly to the individual(s) who will be responsible for preparing your application. At Cloveer, you can call and speak to the employee who will be responsible for preparing your application. They will answer any of your questions and let you know whether or not you are eligible to become certified into one of these programs at no cost. Call us at 813-333-5800 to get your questions answered.

2. Don’t choose your consultant solely on their price for services.

The old adage is true. You get what you pay for. If it looks to good too be true, it usually is.

3. Stay away from any consultant that offers you any type of guarantee.

The FAR prohibits any federal consultant to base any fee for their services contingent on certification.

4. Ask as many questions up front as possible. See if they actually know the rules and regulations of the program you want to get certified into. They should be able to answer your eligibility questions quickly and correctly.

Cloveer pre-qualifies all of its potential clients to make sure they meet all of the regulatory requirements.

5. Check the consultants Better Business Bureau report.

If they don’t have a profile established with the BBB, or have negative feedback, this is a sign of potential problems. Cloveer is an A+ Rated BBB business with zero complaints.

6. Ask them for references you can personally speak to and look for a recent track record of success.

Cloveer has real references that are published on our website that you can call and speak to.

7. Look at their website to see if they provide more than just sales information.

Cloveer.com has an extensive FAQ section along with a comprehensive blog on getting certified. We want you to understand as much as possible before making a decision on whether or not to pursue certification.

8.  Make sure that the agreement provided for services to be rendered covers everything.

All services provided by Cloveer are on a fixed price basis so there will be no hidden charges.

For More information on getting your 8a Certified, HUBZone Certified or VETBiz Certified, call us at 813-333-5800 or visit www.cloveer.com

 

Financial Statements – 35 Items the SBA reviews when applying for 8(a) Certification

When applying for the 8(a) Program you are required to submit the following financial statements for the business:

  1. Year to date Balance sheet and income statements, no older than 90 days, including a detailed A/P and A/R aging statement if you are operating on an accrual basis.

2. The last three years of Balance sheet and income statements (e.g. 2016, 2015, & 2014)

You should ensure that all financials provided are prepared on generally accepted accounting principles or an accepted cash basis.

What does the SBA reviewer look for when they review these:
*Note* The following items are taken from the current SBA SOP.

1. Are the current year to date financials no older than 90 days from date of receipt by the SBA?

2. Are the aging schedules for A/P and A/R consistent with with the year to date balance sheet?

3. Are any A/P or A/R more than 90 days old?

4. Do the balance sheets balance?

5. Are current assets recorded properly?

6. If the business is a dealer, wholesaler, or supplier, does the firm maintain any inventory?

7. Does the firm have fixed assets? If so, are these fixed assets recorded properly?

8. Are the fixed assets reported with depreciation or at actual value?

9. Do the firm’s fixed assets correspond with its type of business? For example, if the firm performs construction work does it have construction equipment?

10. If there is a partner shareholder or officer loan, is there a copy of the loan document? Is this loan reflected on the individual’s SBA Form 413, Personal Financial Statement?

11. Are there loans or notes receivable from a shareholder, officer or partner?

12. Has a copy of the loan or note been provided?

13. Does the loan reflect generally accepted repayment terms? If not, is this item over-inflating the firm’s assets?

14. Does the firm have the ability to service debts?

15. Are there any loans that are questionable or that may raise concerns regarding control?

16. Do retained earnings reconcile with previous financial statements?

17. Does the listed business equity match that reported on the Personal Financial Statements of the owners?

18. Is the profit and loss statement correctly calculated?

19. Does the profit and loss statement show revenues in the appropriate business activity?

20. Is “Cost of Goods Sold” included?

21. Are the line items properly recorded?

22. If there is an expense for salaries for employees, are employees listed on SBA Form 1010?

23. If there is an expense for worker’s compensation, are employees listed on SBA Form 1010?

24. Is the disadvantaged individual the firm’s highest compensated officer or employee? If not, has an explanation of the salary structure been provided?

25. Are there any large subcontracting expenses that appear questionable?

26. Does the firm appear to be in compliance with the percentage of work requirements for its primary business?

27. Does the firm appear to have the necessary equipment, financial resources, working capital, etc., to perform 8(a) contracts it may be awarded?

28. Are there questionable items listed on the statements, or have things changed significantly from the previous year end statement?

29. Are there indications that excessive withdrawals have occurred?

30. Does the firm have financing by non-disadvantaged individual(s) that would be considered critical financing? Also, is the loan payable upon demand?

31. Are there any significant changes in any categories that create a concern? For example, have loans disappeared?

32. What pattern are the revenues, profits, and losses showing? Is there a need to ask for clarification, such as an explanation of the reason for a downward trend or sudden revenue drop?

33. Are there any discrepancies between the firm’s tax returns and the statements? Are these discrepancies based on cash versus accrual? If not, is reconciliation required? Does taking into consideration cash versus accrual reconcile the accounts?

34. Do the balance sheets correspond with the tax return schedules? For example, are there shareholder loans on the tax return schedules that are not reflected on the financial statements?

35. Do the statements and corresponding tax returns reflect any conversions from accrual to cash accounting?

Need assistance with your 8(a) Application? Call us at 813-333-5800 or visit www.cloveer.com for more information.

Reduce your 8(a) Application review time, at the SBA, by 30+ days.

There are several certifications that are required to be submitted within your 8(a) Application paperwork. Failure to submit these signed and dated certifications will result in a letter back from the SBA deeming your 8(a) Application deficient or incomplete.

Please note. None of the below certifications are identified within the SBA’s current 8(a) Checklist. This blog post alone will save you at least one letter back from the SBA and possibly 30+ days of processing time at the SBA.

5 certification sheets that you must provide to the SBA within your 8(a) Application paperwork:

  1. Certification that the applicant firm’s financial statements truthfully and accurately represent the financial condition of my company.
  2. Certification that no 8(a) applicant, owner, director, or key officer of the applicant firm, or the applicant firm itself, have any delinquent federal obligations, past due taxes or liens.
  3. Certification that no immediate family member of any 8(a) applicant, owner, director, or key officer of the applicant firm has ever been an officer, director or shareholder of any other firm that is a current 8(a) Program participant or was a previous participant in the 8(a) Program.
  4. Certification that no 8(a) applicant, owner, director, or key officer of the applicant firm has ever been an officer, director or shareholder of any other firm that is a current 8(a) Program participant or was a previous participant in the 8(a) Program.
  5. Certification that the no 8(a) applicant, owner, director, or key officer of the applicant firm has any ownership interest in any other business other than the applicant firm,  or has an immediate family member who has ownership interest in any other business.

You should put each of the above certifications on a separate printed sheet and sign/date all of these and include a copy within your 8(a) Application. Please make sure all of these certifications provided to the SBA are accurate and truthful. Penalties for misrepresenting anything in your 8(a) Application are severe.

If any of the above cannot be provided because they might apply in your circumstances, please call us at 813-333-5800 for more information.